Arthritis, joint, bone & muscle

Gout

144201 views 1 min to read

A form of arthritis characterised by intense pain in a single joint, often the big toe.

Affected areas

Most commonly affects the big toe, but may also occur in the knee, ankle, elbow and other joints

Symptoms

  • Pain in a joint, that appears very quickly
  • Inflammation
  • Swelling
  • Redness
  • Stiffness of the affected joint

Causes

Gout is a form of arthritis and is associated with high-blood-levels of uric acid, a compound that's a by-product of your body's normal breakdown of food. Uric acid itself is a product of the metabolism of purines, compounds found in a range of food.

Foods containing purines;

  • Offal (including related products like pate)
  • Game meat
  • Some seafood (especially anchovies and sardines)
  • Some vegetables including asparagus and mushrooms

Normally your body maintains uric acid levels by dissolving it in the bloodstream, filtering it through the kidneys and then urinating. If you start creating too much uric acid or other factors prevent your body dealing with the load, then uric acid crystals form on the joints. This is what causes the sudden pain, redness and swelling of gout.

Diet and lifestyle

It is advisable to see your doctor as soon as possible. This is important as gout can cause severe pain and permanent damage to the joints if left untreated. The dietary and lifestyle suggestions below are recommended as support measures but not as a replacement for medical treatment from a qualified medical practitioner.               

Lowering uric acid levels is a priority and changing your diet to reduce your intake of foods containing purines may help with this.

Important notes

Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) or Pseudogout is a similar condition to gout though its causes are unknown. It has been linked with a variety of causes including low magnesium levels in the blood, an over-active parathyroid gland, and excessive quantities of iron, as well as genetic factors.

Get free personalised advice from our team of qualified naturopaths here

Tell us what you think login or sign up to share your thoughts.

thank u for the information on Gout
Anonymous
Anonymous 29 Nov 2013
Hi Jenny,
Thanks for your post.
I’m sorry to hear that you’re starting to develop toe pain.
It’s difficult for me to advise you further without knowing the cause of your toe pain. It may be best for you to visit your GP, and have your toe pain investigated further.
If you need any more help please contact the Blackmores Naturopathic Advisory service on 1800-803-760, or email us at advice@blackmores.com.au
Kind regards,
Charmaine (Blackmores Naturopath)
Charmaine
Charmaine 21 Nov 2013
I started the Pritiken diet 12 days ago and have lost 5 kg in the time. However, yesterday i started getting pain in the base of my big toe. I like the eating program and want to stay on it - what should i do.
Anonymous
Anonymous 21 Nov 2013
Hi Kevin,
Thanks for your post.
I’m sorry to hear that you’re suffering from gout – from what I’ve heard it can be very painful.
I would suggest following as many tips from the article written above – in particular try to follow the dietary advice and avoid alcohol, and foods containing substances known as purines. Purine foods include - gravies, stocks, organ meats, shellfish, anchovies, sardines, herring, mackerel, spinach, mussels, mushrooms and asparagus. Alcohol increases uric acid levels and reduces the body’s ability to excrete uric acid. Avoid sugar, and ensure that you are well hydrated.
You may also find some helpful information on these pages: http://www.blackmores.com.au/learning-centre/article/natural-relief-for-gout and http://www.blackmores.com.au/wellbeing-blog/coping-with-the-pain-of-gout
If you need any more help please contact the Blackmores Naturopathic Advisory service on 1800-803-760, or email us at advice@blackmores.com.au
Kind regards,
Charmaine (Blackmores Naturopath)
Charmaine
Charmaine 18 Nov 2013
Hi,Im kevin and I got gout since last year, and Im trying find out the most effctive ways to fix it. Because, its very very pain when it come out.. so I really wanna to know more about it, and I will follow all of it. Thanks for ur attentions!
Anonymous
Anonymous 18 Nov 2013
Hi David, although your symptoms fit the picture of those who suffer from gout, it is difficult to give a definitive diagnosis here. A diagnosis is often made when uric acid crystals are found in the joints, as the body has difficulties removing the uric acid from the body and deposits it in the tissues. An attack of gout happens suddenly, often overnight. The most commonly affected joint is the big toe, but gout may be experienced in the feet, ankles and knees, and less commonly in the elbows, hands and other joints. Although being in a healthy weight range can lower the incidence of having gout attacks, it does not guarantee against gout attacks. If you identify with your healthcare professional that you have increased uric acid levels (gout), then prevention of gout attacks can be achieved through the advice in the article above. All the best, Jennifer (Blackmores Naturopath)
Jennifer
Jennifer 29 Oct 2013
you can tell me if you think i have gout. I suffer from joint pain in the big toe both thumbs and elbows my hands feel stiff . I also feel burning pain and tingles . I have no swelling , the pain is moderate and consistent .I have had this condition for a couple of weeks. I have had these attacks before. My doctor could not find anything wrong. I am 60 in good health fit and not overweight.
Anonymous
Anonymous 28 Oct 2013
Hi Kharel, Gout occurs when uric acid builds up in the bloodstream and deposits urate crystals in the joint. The build-up of uric acid is most commonly caused by under-excretion of uric acid by the kidneys, but may also be caused by the overproduction of uric acid by the body. This condition is called hyperuricaemia and can be hereditary. Other causes of gout can include the use of diuretics (fluid tablets) which can cause the retention of too much uric acid. Gout sufferers would need to avoid foods containing substances known as purines. Purine foods include- gravies, stocks, organ meats, shellfish, anchovies, sardines, herring, mackerel, spinach, mussels, mushrooms and asparagus. Alcohol increases uric acid levels and reduces the body’s ability to excrete uric acid. The herb celery may help assits with the symptoms of gout, as well as vitamin C. All the best, Jen (Blackmores naturopath).
Jennifer
Jennifer 23 Sep 2013